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Posts Tagged ‘upgrade’

If you’ve been getting blue faces when watching YouTube clips, or any other Adobe Flash videos, the cause can be hard to pinpoint. When faces and flames, and other red/orange elements, turn varying shades of blue, it can be due to a buggy Flash update (especially for 64-bit users), or it can be due to video card driver issues (currently it seems to be affects a few Nvidia users after upgrading to Ubuntu 12.04 – read more at the bottom). Whatever the cause, this issue usually drives people to uninstall Flash, then reinstall an earlier version.

But hopefully the following fix will correct the colours in the movies you watch in Firefox or Chrome (and any other web browsers) without having to resort to such drastic measures. All you need to do is create a text file and paste a line of text into it, but since saving it will fail unless you create the folder first, do so by running the following in the terminal:

sudo mkdir /etc/adobe/

Now to create the file and open it for editing:

gksu gedit /etc/adobe/mms.cfg

When it opens, paste in the following:

EnableLinuxHWVideoDecode=1

Close the file, and confirm you want to save the changes. Now, all you need to do is restart your browser and your clips should look fine. If not, you may need to reboot, and hopefully all is fine when you return.

The EASY WAY: Now that you understand what’s needed, you could cheat and just do the whole process with one command:

sudo mkdir /etc/adobe/ && echo -e "EnableLinuxHWVideoDecode=1" | sudo tee /etc/adobe/mms.cfg > /dev/null

If you also want to force the Flash player to bypass its GPU validity checks (GPU validation – see below), then the command would be:

sudo mkdir /etc/adobe/ && echo -e "OverrideGPUValidation=1\nEnableLinuxHWVideoDecode=1" | sudo tee /etc/adobe/mms.cfg > /dev/null

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That Didn’t Work, or Caused Problems? In some cases, you might find you need to disable GPU validation in addition to, or instead of, telling Flash to use vdpau hardware acceleration. If you’re experiencing trouble at some sites but not others (like YouTube videos are now fine, but at Vimeo the Flash plugin crashes), you may want to play around with the settings. For example, to enable the acceleration but bypass GPU validation, the text in mms.cfg would be:

OverrideGPUValidation=1
EnableLinuxHWVideoDecode=1

… or the following to just bypass GPU validation:

OverrideGPUValidation=1
EnableLinuxHWVideoDecode=0

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To Revert Back: If these tweaks have caused you more headache than it was worth, just delete the entire folder you created with:

sudo rm -r /etc/adobe

Or you can just edit the file with:

gksu gedit /etc/adobe/mms.cfg

… and set EnableLinuxHWVideoDecode= to 0 if you prefer to keep it.

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Nvidia users: Apparently the issue (which Adobe reportedly won’t be fixing) is caused by having hardware acceleration enabled, so right-clicking a Flash video, choosing Settings… and disabling “Enable hardware acceleration” can often fix this. However, the above fix is perhaps more elegant since you’re allowing Flash to use vdpau hardware acceleration, rather than just disabling it altogether.

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Please note: this is an updated version of the guide for restoring the volume button in Ubuntu 10.04/Gnome 2, and is specifically for those using the Gnome 3 “Classic” (Fallback) desktop (though may be applicable for Gnome-Shell and Unity).

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If you’ve just upgraded to 12.04 “Precise Pangolin” and found that the volume icon/button is missing from the system tray (at the far-right of the top Gnome panel), you can choose between adding the newer indicator applet, or running the old stand-alone volume button like back in Gnome 2. With the indicator applet, it will load automatically with each boot, but it doesn’t take much to get the legacy volume button to do the same.

Volume Button:

Note: Those who’ve had to do this before in Ubuntu 10.04 through to 11.10 will have noted the package gnome-volume-control-applet no longer exists, but since it has just been renamed, all you need to do is change the command to gnome-sound-applet.

To run it for the current session, hit Alt+F2 to open the Run Application app, paste gnome-sound-applet into the text field, and click the Run button (you can also enter the command into a terminal, but the button will disappear if you close the terminal).

To get it to start automatically from the next reboot, click the cog in the top-right (in Unity) and open Startup Applications and add it as a new entry with a name like “Volume Button”. If you’re using Gnome Classic, your user menu in the top-right won’t include Startup Applications, so just run gnome-session-properties via Alt+F2 or in a terminal.

If for some reason the volume app is missing on your system, run sudo apt-get install gnome-sound-applet in the terminal.

Indicator Applet:

Alt+Right-click an empty area of the panel (if you have Compiz effects enabled, then you will need to hold Alt+Super/Windows while right-clicking), choose Add to Panel, then drag Indicator Applet Complete to next to the clock in the system tray, or wherever you want to put it instead. The volume button will be restored, but as part of the Indicator Applet which also has a mail/message notifier for Evolution and messaging apps, as well as showing when other apps like Rhythmbox music player are open.

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

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Thunar is the default file manager in Xfce, and happily runs in Ubuntu. But besides being a great backup in case Nautilus plays up, the reason I’ve always told people to install it is the awesome Bulk Rename app that comes along with it.

Now, if you’re reading this, chances are you’ve already got it installed, but you probably noticed you get the following error trying to launch the app after upgrading your system to 11.04 Natty Narwhal:

Error: Failed to execute child process “/usr/lib/thunar/ThunarBulkRename” (No such file or directory)

Basically, there are two errors causing this, being not only the wrong path specified, but also the name of the command. If you look at the properties of the launcher, you’ll see the path /usr/lib/thunar is specified, with the command being ThunarBulkRename %F.

All you need to do is change the command to Thunar -B (no need to specify a path), and your launcher will work again.

Additional Info:

You may see mention online of the Thunar plugin thunar-bulk-rename, but you can ignore that, as the renamer is now part of the thunar-sbr package, which should be installed by default along with Thunar. If you don’t find Bulk Rename in Applications > Accessories, then run sudo apt-get install thunar-sbr in a terminal.

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

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When initramfs (the initial ramdisk filesystem used to boot into Ubuntu) is updated, whether it be during an official upgrade or through some manual tinkering, the last thing you want to happen is get an error message. More often than not, when you reboot, you won’t be able to get to your desktop, so it’s best to tackle any issues before you do so.

If you were lucky enough to see the initramfs update fail in the terminal, you can usually have success by running it again. If you updated or upgraded your system and didn’t even know anything went wrong until you failed to log in again, there are still ways to get around this.

You’ll find a few different approaches to various error messages, so hopefully something here will be of use to you. When it comes to specific firmware issues, you may need to start a thread at the Ubuntu forums (quite often, someone will point you towards a patch). Best of luck!

Last Resort for Boot Failure Due to initramfs Error

I’ve listed this first, as in most cases it will work, but it should be your last resort. When booting, choose an earlier kernel from the GRUB list, and you should be able to get to your desktop to fix things. Technically, you really should avoid this, especially if you’ve just upgraded Ubuntu and the kernel along with it, since running certain commands may complicate things, or just waste your time. For example, it’s no use recompiling initrd.img when you’ll be doing so to the one for the previous kernel.

But you can use this method to get to your desktop, search the forums and web for answers, and edit configuration files. And, as an absolute last resort, you can even open Synaptic and remove the latest kernel, then reinstall it (take note of all package names when uninstalling, to make sure you reinstall everything correctly).

Failure Generating /boot/initrd.img

This error is unfortunately common, and the message you’ll see is like:

update-initramfs: failed for /boot/initrd.img-2.6.32-22-generic

Quite often, running the following command will let the update start again:

sudo update-initramfs -u

Continued “dpkg was interrupted” Error

This error occurs when the initramfs update has halted, sometimes because something has interfered, but generally when it gives up trying to get the files from the server:

dpkg was interrupted, you must manually run ‘sudo dpkg --configure -a’ to correct the problem

While it gives you the answer, you might find yourself in an endless loop of running sudo dpkg --configure -a over and over again. If it just won’t stop, the last thing you want to do is reboot without having tackled this, so here is a work-around that may help. You’ll be editing a text configuration file as superuser, so paste the following into a terminal:

sudo gedit /etc/initramfs-tools/update-initramfs.conf

Locate the line “update_initramfs=yes” and change it to “update_initramfs=no“. Save and exit the file, then run:

sudo dpkg --configure -a

Hopefully, everything should be fine when you reboot, and later you can try changing the “no” back to “yes” in update-initramfs.conf.

initramfs Update Aborted & Recovery Fails

This problem is fairly common, and can generally be remedied easily, even though it produces a long and rather sinister error message that looks like:

Processing triggers for initramfs-tools … update-initramfs: Generating /boot/initrd.img-2.6.32-22-generic dpkg: subprocess post-installation script killed by signal (Interrupt) Could not install the upgrades The upgrade aborts now. Your system could be in an unusable state. A recovery will run now (dpkg --configure -a). Please report this bug against the ‘update-manager’ package and include the files in /var/log/dist-upgrade/ in the bugreport. E:Sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (2) Setting up initramfs-tools (0.85eubuntu36) … update-initramfs: deferring update (trigger activated) Processing triggers for initramfs-tools … update-initramfs: Generating /boot/initrd.img-2.6.32-22-generic Could not install the upgrades The upgrade aborts now. Your system could be in an unusable state. A recovery will run now (dpkg --configure -a). Please report this bug against the ‘update-manager’ package and include the files in /var/log/dist-upgrade/ in the bugreport. installArchives() failed

You might find that running sudo dpkg --configure -a as suggested doesn’t help, but the following command should do the trick:

sudo update-initramfs -u

Delete Corrupted initrd.img Then Run Update Again

Here’s another way you may be able to get around the familiar update-initramfs: failed for /boot/initrd.img… error message. Some have success with the following commands, so you can try them first:

sudo dpkg --configure -a

sudo apt-get update

But don’t be surprised to find yourself back where you started, but here is a trick that seems rather unlikely, but has worked before: move or delete initrd.img. If that file is corrupted, you would think it would just get overwritten in the update, yet deleting (or moving, if you want to play it safe) initrd.img has made all the difference in some instances.

It’s probably safer just to move the file, since if a replacement is successfully generated, you can delete it later. To move it to your home folder, enter the following command, remembering to replace the kernel number with the one you’re moving:

sudo mv /boot/initrd.img-2.6.32-22-generic ~/

Or you can open the /boot folder as root, and just drag the file to wherever you want:

gksu nautilus /boot

Now try those first two commands, and hopefully all goes well.

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Hopefully a trick or two here saved your day; if not, godspeed in sorting it out!

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

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Please note: this article is for users of Ubuntu 10.04 through to 11.10users of 12.04 onwards read this guide instead.

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If you’ve just upgraded to 10.04 “Lucid Lynx” and found that the volume icon/button is missing from the system tray (at the far-right of the top Gnome panel), there are two ways you can get it back:

Right-click an empty area of the panel, choose Add to Panel, then drag Indicator Applet to next to the clock in the system tray, or wherever you want to put it instead. The volume button will be restored, but as part of the Indicator Applet which also has a mail/message notifier for Evolution and messaging apps, as well as showing when other apps like Rhythmbox music player are open.

OR (if you don’t want to use the Indicator Applet,
but want the old volume button back):

Use Alt+F2 to open the Run Application app, paste gnome-volume-control-applet into the text field, and click the Run button (you can also enter the command into a terminal, but the button will disappear if you close the terminal). To get it to start automatically from the next reboot, go to System > Preferences > Startup Applications and add it as a new entry with a name like “Volume Button”.

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Here are some ways to Customise your Indicator Applet:

Remove Evolution Mail Notifier from Indicator Applet in Ubuntu’s System Tray

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

Read Full Post »