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Posts Tagged ‘thumbnails’

Ever since Ubuntu 10.04 “Lucid Lynx”, there has been a white border around thumbnails of pictures and videos when you look in a folder. But you can actually change that to whatever you want, and here I’ll show you how to turn the distracting white border into a nice drop-shadow, free of any other border.

Open a terminal and enter the following:

wget http://a.imageshack.us/img135/8666/thumbnailframe.png

That will download the image file to your home folder; the following command will then move it to the folder where Nautilus (your file manager) keeps its image files, renaming it appropriately as it does so:

sudo mv thumbnailframe.png /usr/share/pixmaps/nautilus/thumbnail_frame.png

Now, you need to totally restart Nautilus:

sudo nautilus -q

If you decide that you want to restore the original white border, you can basically run the same sequence again, but this time downloading the familiar thumbnail background:

wget http://a.imageshack.us/img651/5790/thumbnailframey.png

sudo mv thumbnailframey.png /usr/share/pixmaps/nautilus/thumbnail_frame.png

nautilus -q

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Additional notes:

Obviously, you can play around with your own thumbnail borders using the dimensions of the drop-shadow image (quite simply a square).

Also, if you would prefer to copy rather than move the image files to the Nautilus folder, thereby always having copies in your home folder, replace mv (move) in the command with cp (copy).

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Just in case the images are no longer available, you can find them below. Simply right-click them and (1) in the case of the larger drop-shadow image, choose to save the target of the image (or open it in a new tab and save the image that appears), and (2) in the small default image below it, choose to save the image. If you saved them to your home folder, the second command in each sequence will still apply; if you saved them to another folder, like ~/Downloads, open a terminal in that folder and the commands will work fine.

Right-click & save the target (not this smaller image)

Right-click & save this image

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Dolphin became the default file manager when KDE went to 4.0, so Kubuntu users already know what a great program it is (unless they preferred to stick with the previous default file manager, Konqueror). While Ubuntu‘s desktop environment, Gnome, has certainly stepped up of late when it comes to visual effects, screenlets and the like, KDE has always been about “bells and whistles”. And while Gnome can end up looking pretty stunning, the same can’t be said about its default file manager, Nautilus, which is about as plain as they come.

Dolphin, on the other hand, has the little niceties one would expect of a KDE file manager, like animated folder icons, and a lot more. There is an easy to access zoom slider for thumbnails, and has some pretty unique “views”. You can customise it in ways you could only dream of in Nautilus or Thunar, like not only add extra panes, but also move them where you like, and resize them to your needs.

If you look at the above pic, you’ll see that you can add a Folders (“tree”) pane and put it above the Information pane on the right (you could put it under Places, of course, but why not save that for shortcuts). Also, you can add a Terminal to the bottom, so whatever folder you’re in, you can just type commands without having to open a terminal in each folder (or continually change paths).

The views are Icons (like the same in Nautilus, but smaller, and just the icon, no preview),Details (your standard row-by-row format with information next to each file), Columns (starts off with 2 columns, and every sub-folder you click on opens another), Preview (turns your icons into thumbnails, and folders will show previews of pics inside), andSplit (gives you 2 columns you can browse with).

When you are inSplit mode, you can look at the beginning and end of a large folder at the same time, or use the second column to browse another folder or drive. The Columns mode offers another interesting and useful way of browsing, so you certainly have a few choices in ways to browse.

Some things to note are that with Dolphin, like other KDE file managers, the default is to treat a single-click as a double-click. This can confuse Gnome users, as even slowly clicking a file will open it. All you need to do to select a file is click the green + that appears in the top left corner when you hover your cursor, and it will select it. But if you’re selecting a file simply to know the filesize, like you would in Nautilus, then you don’t need to, as that information will appear in the status bar and the Information pane simply by hovering your cursor over the file.

Not only that, but if you are in Icons view, hovering over picture files will show the preview in the Information pane. In Preview mode, another nice feature is that when you hover your mouse cursor over a folder, its preview thumbnail will cycle through other pictures in the folder (which you can see in the second pic, as the selected folder looks different from the preview in the Information pane).

So there are some great reasons to try out Dolphin. There’s a lot more you can do to customise its interface, and if the single-click/double-click issue ends up annoying you, then don’t worry, you can change the setting to what you’re used to. You can change that and other default settings via Settings > Configure Dolphin.

While Dolphin needs certain KDE libraries, etc, to function, any such dependencies will be installed with the program into your Ubuntu/Gnome system. Mark it for installation in Synaptic, or enter in a terminal:

sudo apt-get install dolphin

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

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The default “view” in both Nautilus and Thunar file managers is the Icon or thumbnail view, which you can of course change if ever you want via the View menu. If you’re happy with thumbnails, but they’re too big for your liking, or you actually want to make them larger, like in your ~/Pictures folder, hold the Ctrl button while you zoom in or out with your mouse scroll wheel.

In Nautilus (the default file manager in Ubuntu), you can make the thumbnails of pics rather huge, like only 2 fitting in each row, and the icons for any folders in there won’t be too large. On top of that, the change will only be recorded in the folder you’re in, so you can have most of your folders displaying thumbnails at the default size, have a few where the thumbnails are quite small, and then have huge thumbnails for folders like ~/Pictures.

In Thunar (Xubuntu‘s default file manager), you can only go so big, and in your ~/Pictures folder the icons for any folders in there might actually look bigger than the thumbnails for pics; also, do that to one folder, and it is a global change (ie: it happens to the rest).

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

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