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Posts Tagged ‘plugin’

Up until Rhythmbox version 2.96 (the current version in Ubuntu 13.04 is 2.98), the bottom section of the left-hand pane where your devices and playlists are was reserved for the current album’s cover art. Since then, that has been removed and a much smaller version of the cover appears left of the song info in the top toolbar. While this is merely a cosmetic issue, and nothing to get too upset over, nonetheless it was pretty cool seeing a nice-sized picture of the cover appear at the bottom of the left pane.

Rhythmbox Art Display Plugin

But fret not, as there is a way to get this back, via the Cover art display plugin for Rhythmbox. And while it currently isn’t in the software repos for Raring Ringtail 13.04, I’ll show you how to get around that too, and install it easily.

First, you’ll need to add the plugins PPA to your software sources, which you can do by pasting the following command into the terminal:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:fossfreedom/rhythmbox-plugins

Once that’s done, update your software sources list with:

sudo apt-get update

Now to install the plugin (if there is a current version of the plugin that can be installed):

sudo apt-get install rhythmbox-plugin-artdisplay

If you’re informed that the package could not be found, it means there is still no version ready for 13.04, but this is no real problem, as we can just install the 12.10 version. To fix this, you’ll need to edit the Rhythmbox plugins sources list:

sudo gedit /etc/apt/sources.list.d/fossfreedom-rhythmbox-plugins-raring.list

… then copy the line that should be at the top of the file deb http://ppa.launchpad.net/fossfreedom/rhythmbox-plugins/ubuntu raring main and paste it at the bottom of the file, then replace “raring” with “quantal“. Once you’ve saved and closed the file, the sources list for plugins will specify to look for both 13.04 (Raring Ringtail) and 12.10 (Quantal Quetzal) versions, and when you sudo apt-get update again, all the available plugins will be listed in your package manager. You can then install this plugin and others via Ubuntu Software Center or Synaptic Package Manager, or just run the install command again (sudo apt-get install rhythmbox-plugin-artdisplay).

Once it’s installed, all you have to do is enable it. Go to Edit > Plugins and enable the Cover art display plugin. Your cover art should now be in the left pane, with the smaller one still in the toolbar near the song title.

If for some reason you don’t want the smaller cover in the toolbar any more (I say have both, but that’s up to your tastes), you can disable that by going to the View menu and un-checking Album Art.

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Note: If you’re reading this in Ubuntu 13.10 or above, and there is no current version after adding the PPA, edit the sources file accordingly, meaning substitute the word relating to your current version with that of the previous one. In other words, in Raring Ringtail 13.04 we had to replace “raring” with “quantal” for Quantal Quetzal 12.10, in Saucy Salamander 13.10 you would replace “saucy” with “raring“, and so forth (and if all fails, just replace that with “quantal“, which definitely has a version of the plugin).

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If you’ve recently upgraded to 10.10 “Maverick Meerkat”, you will notice that when you double-click an .iso disc image file, it will want to create an image checksum (for data verification) before it burns the disc. For most of us, this is annoying, as it needlessly adds time to the burning process.

What’s worse is that once the image has been burned to disc, it will want to do it all over again, even though it apparently does not even compare the first checksum with the final one.

If you’ve tried the Preferences button before burning the image only to find nothing useful, the answer can be found by opening the main program window (Applications > Sound & Video > Brasero Disc Burner), and going to Edit > Plugins.

You will see 2 plugins related to checksum creation/verification: File ChecksumEnables Brasero to check the integrity of files“, while Image ChecksumEnables Brasero to perform integrity checks on discs after they have been burnt. Also enables the writing of a small file which holds the MD5 sum of all the files on the disc“.

Now, in my situation the Image Checksum doesn’t seem to do anything but waste time. In theory, having it create a checksum file and sticking it on the disc for later verification seems a great idea, but I’m personally wary of that as it could render some bootable discs useless. Luckily, from what I have seen, it does nothing of the sort, and it seems no checksum file is created anywhere, meaning this plugin is really just wasting your time.

But simply uncheck the Image Checksum plugin to disable it, and your burn process will go back to how it was.

Extra Notes:

You can also uncheck the File Checksum plugin, since it is much simpler verifying data discs via the terminal, but this is not vital.

If you actually find this plugin useful, you can choose the SHA1 or SHA256 hashing algorithms instead of the default MD5, simply by clicking Configure.

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

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32-bit Ubuntu users: You can read this for some general info, but for installation of Flash use this guide instead.

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While Flash support on Linux distros used to be a nightmare, most people these days rarely need to bother fiddling with it. In fact, installing Flash support on 32-bit i386 systems it can be even easier than doing the same in Windows. But 64-bit users often find it is one big mess, and this has nothing to do with Ubuntu, as Adobe has only ever released a 32-bit version, as incredible as that may seem.

At the time of writing, there is the first alpha 64-bit version available, so things are looking up. While you could be forgiven for not trusting a product that isn’t even at its first beta level yet, from what I have seen it is stable, and should be the answer you are looking for. While this might not be the solution to help everyone, hopefully it is the answer to your Flash woes.

What you first need to do is go into Synaptic and completely remove the package flashplugin-installer, or do so with the following command in a terminal (if you never installed it, obviously you can skip this step):

sudo apt-get purge flashplugin-installer

If you suspect you may have installed some open source Flash plugins, open Synaptic and enter “flash” in the Quick search bar. I personally removed the popular gnash just to be safe (since it and the Adobe one always fought for supremacy, though that was never the problem, considering I installed Gnash after the Adobe product failed me). You can leave swfdec-gnome if that is installed, as that handles things like giving thumbnail previews for .swf files in Nautilus, etc, and doesn’t appear to cause any conflicts.

You can always try just skipping all that and seeing if the 32- and 64-bit versions happily co-exist, but since the 32-bit one is failing you anyway, you may as well uninstall it and save any potential headaches.

Next, we need to add the Adobe Flash repository to the APT sources, update the sources list, then download and install the 64-bit plugin. This is easily done by pasting the following into a terminal:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:sevenmachines/flash && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install flashplugin64-installer

Note that if you get an error, most likely because during the sources update it failed to fetch some info, this install will fail (since it won’t actually get to the last command and download and install anything). However, if you open Synaptic and search for “flash“, you will see there is now flashplugin64-installer included in the list of found packages, and is then easily installed (though you could always just run sudo apt-get install flashplugin64-installer in a terminal).

If you prefer, you can run each of the three commands separately:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:sevenmachines/flash
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install flashplugin64-installer

That way if the update fails, you can run it again and then run the last command when ready.

After that, you should have Flash support in Firefox and other web browsers, and you shouldn’t even need to reboot (though if you didn’t already exit Firefox before installing Flash, restart the program now, and you should be able to watch Flash vids).

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If you want to make sure the plugin is installed properly (without viewing a Flash clip, which is obviously the best way to get this info), just enter about:plugins in the Firefox address bar and hit Enter. You should see the Flash section right near the top.

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If you are trying to load a movie DVD into Kaffeine or MPlayer, or any other multimedia or video player, and you get the error:

Cannot find input plugin for MRL [dvd:/]

… then creating a symlink via the terminal might be the quick and easy answer to your woes. Basically, you need to link your disc drive’s address to the device /dev/dvd, then all should be good.

Just take note of your drive’s actual mount point, or visible address, which should be something like /media/cdrom0 (and don’t worry if it has the word “cdrom” in it, as it just means any optical disc drive, including DVD burners). Then simply enter the following into a terminal (replacing the drive’s address, if need be), and your DVDs should now open fine:

sudo ln -s /media/cdrom0 /dev/dvd

±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±

Command won’t work? Then your mount point doesn’t match the one listed in the command (/media/cdrom0 is quite common, but by no means universal). All you have to do is change it to the correct address; if you don’t know what your mount point is, then read this.

±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±±

Note that you may need to repeat this after rebooting, so you can just hit the on your keyboard to save you retyping it in the terminal, or just make an alias for it. If it’s a common bug, it should get fixed soon enough, but at least it isn’t that much of a major deal getting Kaffeine working again in regards to DVD playback.

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

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