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If you’ve come across some commands that require the actual device name of your CD/DVD drive (eg: /dev/dvd), rather than the mount point (eg: /media/cdrom0), it pays to know what it is, as commands won’t work if they’re looking in the wrong place. There are a couple of ways of doing this, and you’ll probably find they give conflicting outputs, but where one is not useful to you, the other will be; for example, if your drive is both /dev/scd0 and /dev/sr0, you might find /dev/sr0 works for most commands, and where it fails /dev/scd0 won’t.

Method 1:

To find out the name of the block device file representing your optical disc drive, enter the following into a terminal, without a disc in the drive:

wodim --devices

The information will be displayed as follows:

wodim: Overview of accessible drives (1 found) :
————————————————————————-
0 dev=’/dev/scd0‘ rwrw-- : ‘ASUS’ ‘DRW-24B1ST’
————————————————————————-

If there is a disc in the tray, you will see the following error, so just eject the disc and run the command again:

wodim: No such file or directory.
Cannot open SCSI driver!
For possible targets try ‘wodim --devices’
or ‘wodim -scanbus’.
For possible transport specifiers try ‘wodim
dev=help’.
For IDE/ATAPI devices configuration,
see the file README.ATAPI.setup from
the wodim documentation.

Method 2:

To find out the name of the block device file representing your optical disc drive, as well as its mount point, enter the following into a terminal:

mount|grep ^'/dev'

The output will look as follows:

/dev/sda3 on / type ext4 (rw)
/dev/sda1 on /media/Windows XP type fuseblk (rw,nosuid,nodev,allow_other,blksize=4096)
/dev/sr0 on /media/cdrom0 type iso9660 (ro,noexec,nosuid,nodev,unhide,user=ozzman)


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Please note that this is for the next-generation GRUB 2, not the “legacy” version of GRUB still widely in use. If unsure, check out this guide on how to find out which version of GRUB you are using. For the legacy GRUB version of this guide, click here.

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GRUB 2 has a different system for naming drives than you’re used to in Linux, and you will need to understand this before proceeding with commands or customisisation that requires this specific information. Both the drive and the partition are numbers in GRUB 2, with the drive starting from 0 (zero) and the partition starting with 1 (this is unlike legacy GRUB where both start with zero).

This is different from the Linux convention of naming a drive a letter, and its partitions as numbers, starting with a and 1 respectively (eg: “a” in sda1 meaning first drive, with the “1” meaning the first partition on that drive). Also note that the drive and partition are separated with a , (comma) in the designations GRUB 2 uses.

So therefore the first partition on the first hard drive (sda1 or hda1 in Linux) is hd0,1 in GRUB 2. Similarly, your second hard drive (sdb or hdb) would actually be hd1, and if you were talking about the 7th partition on your 3rd drive (sdc7 or hdc7) it would be hd2,7.

↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔

☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻

Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

Read Full Post »

Please note that this is for the “legacy” version of GRUB still widely in use, not the next-generation GRUB 2. If unsure, check out this guide on how to find out which version of GRUB you are using. For the GRUB 2 version of this guide, click here.

↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔

GRUB has a different system for naming drives than you’re used to in Linux, and you will need to understand this before proceeding with commands or customisisation that requires this specific information. Both the drive and the partition are numbers in GRUB, and starting from 0 (zero).

This is different from the Linux convention of naming a drive a letter, and its partitions as numbers, starting with a and 1 respectively (eg: “a” in sda1 meaning first drive, with the “1” meaning the first partition on that drive). Also note that the drive and partition are separated with a , (comma) in the designations GRUB uses.

So therefore the first partition on the first hard drive (sda1 or hda1 in Linux) is hd0,0 in GRUB. Similarly, your second hard drive (sdb or hdb) would actually be hd1, and if you were talking about the 7th partition on your 3rd drive (sdc7 or hdc7) it would be hd2,6.

↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔↔

☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻

Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

Read Full Post »