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Posts Tagged ‘Lucid Lynx’

If you’ve upgraded your system to 10.04Lucid Lynx“, then you may have noticed one of two possible things with the “Location Bar” in Nautilus: you either only have “breadcrumbs” (those navigation buttons above the folder contents) or an “address bar” where you can enter text to browse to another folder. There used to be a very handy toggle button to the left, but in their infinite wisdom the developers have chosen to remove it.

Most disgruntled users seem to be complaining that they’re left with “ugly” and “useless” breadcrumbs, whereas they’d prefer to have the address bar, so they can type addresses. For me and many others, it was the other way around, as those breadcrumbs are invaluable for jumping back or forward many folders with one click, and the address bar is occasionally handy for typing or pasting in a path. Actually, I was constantly using the toggle button, since while breadcrumbs were fine for much of my browsing, I did a lot of copying of folder paths for various tasks, as well as pasting paths to system folders for system hacks I found online.

Since there is no longer a toggle button, users with only breadcrumbs will need to hit Ctrl+L to show the text-entry address bar (and Esc to go back to breadcrumbs) You can also hit the / key and it will show the address bar, but empty (well, except for it beginning with “/“), ready for you to type or paste an address (so if you want to copy the address of the current folder, use Ctrl+L). Note that once you refresh a window, it will go back to breadcrumbs, so if you want to make it stick as the default, use the tip at the end of this article.

If you’re stuck with the address bar, you might find Ctrl+L does nothing to bring back your beloved breadcrumbs. For this, you’ll have to hack a Gnome setting, so open Applications > System Tools > Configuration Editor (or Alt+F2 and enter gconf-editor). Once open, browse to /apps/nautilus/preferences/, and in the right pane you will notice the option “always_use_location_entry”, so untick that to reset it to breadcrumbs. You can then use Ctrl+L for when you need the address bar, and click the Reload button to get back the breadcrumbs once finished. Note that currently clicking Reload doesn’t always bring back the breadcrumbs, but if you browse to another folder, or use your Back/Forward buttons, the “Location Bar” will then be reset.

For those wanting to make the address bar view the default, you’ll find that there is no tick next to “always_use_location_entry”, so when you tick it your “Location Bar” will be a text-entry address bar from then onwards.

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If you’d like it to default to location entry (address bar), you can always take the easy option and paste the following command into a terminal:

gconftool-2 --set /apps/nautilus/preferences/always_use_location_entry --type=bool

°ºÒθÓº°¤°ºÒθÓº°¤°ºÒθÓº°

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An error occurred while mounting /proc/bus/usb. Press S to skip mounting or M for manual recovery.

If you’re getting this at boot, it is probably a left-over from forcing USB support in VirtualBox in Karmic and before. In Lucid Lynx 10.04, this line is no longer needed, and in fact causes this minor error – though, in some cases, it is actually rendering the system unbootable.

The solution is actually very simple and easy to implement, and merely requires removing or commenting out a line in the fstab file. To do so, open a terminal and enter:

sudo gedit /etc/fstab

Find the line “none /proc/bus/usb usbfs devgid=125,devmode=664 0 0” and either remove it or add a hash (#) to the beginning of the line to turn it into a harmless comment.

If you are in the worst case scenario and can’t get to your desktop at all, then at the command-line (which you can get to in Recovery mode) you’ll have to open fstab in a CLI-based text editor like nano with the command:

sudo nano /etc/fstab

(If using nano, Ctrl+X to exit, Y to confirm saving the changes, leaving the file name as “fstab“, then press Enter)

That’s it – your system should now boot fine.

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

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