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Posts Tagged ‘File’

If you’ve recently upgraded to 10.10 “Maverick Meerkat”, you will notice that when you double-click an .iso disc image file, it will want to create an image checksum (for data verification) before it burns the disc. For most of us, this is annoying, as it needlessly adds time to the burning process.

What’s worse is that once the image has been burned to disc, it will want to do it all over again, even though it apparently does not even compare the first checksum with the final one.

If you’ve tried the Preferences button before burning the image only to find nothing useful, the answer can be found by opening the main program window (Applications > Sound & Video > Brasero Disc Burner), and going to Edit > Plugins.

You will see 2 plugins related to checksum creation/verification: File ChecksumEnables Brasero to check the integrity of files“, while Image ChecksumEnables Brasero to perform integrity checks on discs after they have been burnt. Also enables the writing of a small file which holds the MD5 sum of all the files on the disc“.

Now, in my situation the Image Checksum doesn’t seem to do anything but waste time. In theory, having it create a checksum file and sticking it on the disc for later verification seems a great idea, but I’m personally wary of that as it could render some bootable discs useless. Luckily, from what I have seen, it does nothing of the sort, and it seems no checksum file is created anywhere, meaning this plugin is really just wasting your time.

But simply uncheck the Image Checksum plugin to disable it, and your burn process will go back to how it was.

Extra Notes:

You can also uncheck the File Checksum plugin, since it is much simpler verifying data discs via the terminal, but this is not vital.

If you actually find this plugin useful, you can choose the SHA1 or SHA256 hashing algorithms instead of the default MD5, simply by clicking Configure.

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If you’ve come across some commands that require the actual device name of your CD/DVD drive (eg: /dev/dvd), rather than the mount point (eg: /media/cdrom0), it pays to know what it is, as commands won’t work if they’re looking in the wrong place. There are a couple of ways of doing this, and you’ll probably find they give conflicting outputs, but where one is not useful to you, the other will be; for example, if your drive is both /dev/scd0 and /dev/sr0, you might find /dev/sr0 works for most commands, and where it fails /dev/scd0 won’t.

Method 1:

To find out the name of the block device file representing your optical disc drive, enter the following into a terminal, without a disc in the drive:

wodim --devices

The information will be displayed as follows:

wodim: Overview of accessible drives (1 found) :
————————————————————————-
0 dev=’/dev/scd0‘ rwrw-- : ‘ASUS’ ‘DRW-24B1ST’
————————————————————————-

If there is a disc in the tray, you will see the following error, so just eject the disc and run the command again:

wodim: No such file or directory.
Cannot open SCSI driver!
For possible targets try ‘wodim --devices’
or ‘wodim -scanbus’.
For possible transport specifiers try ‘wodim
dev=help’.
For IDE/ATAPI devices configuration,
see the file README.ATAPI.setup from
the wodim documentation.

Method 2:

To find out the name of the block device file representing your optical disc drive, as well as its mount point, enter the following into a terminal:

mount|grep ^'/dev'

The output will look as follows:

/dev/sda3 on / type ext4 (rw)
/dev/sda1 on /media/Windows XP type fuseblk (rw,nosuid,nodev,allow_other,blksize=4096)
/dev/sr0 on /media/cdrom0 type iso9660 (ro,noexec,nosuid,nodev,unhide,user=ozzman)


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There is a handy little terminal command that can display how many reboots you have till the sytem forces fsck to scan the disk and filesystem for errors, which you can install with:

sudo apt-get install showfsck

Then all you need to do is run the following command:

sudo showfsck

It will output the info like:

16/35 mount(s) until fsck for /dev/disk/by-uuid/daf56d80-15b5-4314-9672-fd91d12a3bd6

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PLEASE NOTE: This article is for earlier versions of Nautilus File Manager (2.x) found in earlier Ubuntu releases running on Gnome 2.x, so will not work in Unity (the default desktop environment) or Gnome Shell, both of which are based on Gnome 3.

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It’s actually quite easy to add a few more basic buttons to the Nautilus toolbar, which you’ll see if you read this guide for adding Cut, Copy & Paste buttons. To add aPropertiesbutton to save you constantly right-clicking files and folders for more info, simply add the following line to nautilus-navigation-window-ui.xml:

<toolitem name="Properties" action="Properties" />

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Apply New Settings Immediately Without Rebooting

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