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Posts Tagged ‘File Management’

Thunar is the default file manager in Xfce, and happily runs in Ubuntu. But besides being a great backup in case Nautilus plays up, the reason I’ve always told people to install it is the awesome Bulk Rename app that comes along with it.

Now, if you’re reading this, chances are you’ve already got it installed, but you probably noticed you get the following error trying to launch the app after upgrading your system to 11.04 Natty Narwhal:

Error: Failed to execute child process “/usr/lib/thunar/ThunarBulkRename” (No such file or directory)

Basically, there are two errors causing this, being not only the wrong path specified, but also the name of the command. If you look at the properties of the launcher, you’ll see the path /usr/lib/thunar is specified, with the command being ThunarBulkRename %F.

All you need to do is change the command to Thunar -B (no need to specify a path), and your launcher will work again.

Additional Info:

You may see mention online of the Thunar plugin thunar-bulk-rename, but you can ignore that, as the renamer is now part of the thunar-sbr package, which should be installed by default along with Thunar. If you don’t find Bulk Rename in Applications > Accessories, then run sudo apt-get install thunar-sbr in a terminal.

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If you upgraded to Ubuntu 11.04 (or installed a fresh Natty Narwhal system) and are running the Classic desktop, you may find something amiss with the ability to bring folder windows or programs to the foreground by holding an item over its taskbar button until it appears.

For example, you’re looking in a folder at a sound file you downloaded, and wish to play it in Banshee, which is already open but hidden from view. Normally, you would drag the file over the Banshee taskbar button in the bottom panel, wait till Banshee appears, then drop the file onto it.

A more common use is perhaps file management, when you’re dragging files and folders from one Nautilus window to another which is hidden from view. This is most handy, as it means you don’t need to carefully line up both source and destination folders before doing the drag-and-dropping.

But you may find something is preventing you from doing this, with the only thing happening is a + sign appearing, and if you finally let go on the panel instead of press the Esc key, a launcher will be created there, which you then have to remove. This is not some new setting you can change in Nautilus‘s preferences (which is evident if you try with another file manager like Thunar), but a Compiz bug. While that obviously needs to be ironed out, there is a way around this, which is to run the following command in a terminal:

compiz --replace

Note that the next time you restart, things will be back as before, but at least you can just run that command again (which you can easily do by hitting the up arrow when in the terminal, or pick from the menu in the Run dialogue via Alt+F2).

Also note that if you try adding that command to your startup programs, it will likely do nothing, but you can always make a launcher for your panel, which you can then click once everything has loaded, or when you go to drag stuff via the taskbar and remember you need to.

This bug will likely be fixed soon enough, but at least there is a way around it for now. If you’d like to add your voice to the bug report (since more voices mean quicker action), click here (note that if you haven’t already got a Launchpad account, it only takes a couple of minutes to join, and is worth the small effort, since you can then report your own bugs).

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Can’t get the Run Application dialog to appear when you hit Alt+F2?

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PLEASE NOTE: This article was written for earlier versions of Nautilus File Manager (2.x) found in earlier Ubuntu releases running on Gnome 2.x, so most of the cosmetic customisations (background/colours and custom toolbar buttons) will not work in Unity (the default desktop environment) or Gnome Shell, both of which are based on Gnome 3. However, the guides for plugins/extensions are still valid, as well as most of the tips for getting more out of Nautilus. Tricks that will only work in legacy versions are marked “Gnome 2 Only“.

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Nautilus is the default file manager for Gnome-based Linux distros like Ubuntu, and has many great features while being easy-to-use for newbies.

But you can make it even more useful, and even more attractive, without too much effort or fuss. So what you’ll find here are links to various articles in this blog dedicated to this task, split up into sections for easier browsing.

While cosmetic alterations and enhancements are some tricks you might try for the fun of it, other tips offer far more usability than you may have thought possible in Nautilus, and may even be the answers to features you’ve been longing to see in the list of your file browser’s capabilities.

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Nautilus Toolbar Enhancements:

Add Toolbar Buttons for New Folder, Cut, Copy, Paste & Trash/Delete (Gnome 2 Only)

Add a File/Folder “Properties” Button to the Nautilus Toolbar (Gnome 2 Only)

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Essential Nautilus Extensions:

Nautilus Open Terminal: Command-Line in the Current Folder

Nautilus GKSU: Open Files & Folders with Administrative Privileges

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More Cool Nautilus Plugins:

Nautilus Image Converter: Easily Resize & Rotate Pictures

Nautilus Image Resizer Extension

Open Selected Folders in New Windows with Nautilus-Actions

Nautilus-Actions: Open in New Window

Open Selected Folder in Image Viewer or Movie Player with Nautilus-Actions

Nautilus-Actions: Adding Movie Player/Videos to Context Menu (DONE!)

Nautilus Pastebin: Send Text Clips to the Web

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Cosmetic Alterations to Nautilus:

Change Background/Colour/Gradient & Assign File/Folder Emblems (Gnome 2 Only)

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Tweaking Nautilus Settings:

Show Hidden Files by Default in Nautilus

Show Text-Entry Address Bar or “Breadcrumbs” (Buttons)

Enable Split-Pane File Browsing (Gnome 2 Only)

Nautilus Thumbnails: Zoom In or Out with Your Mouse

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Applying New Settings:

Apply New Settings Immediately Without Rebooting

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File Management Tricks:

Change File Icon & Permissions + Default Program for a File Extension

Add Program to List of Applications in “Open With” When Right-Clicking Files in Nautilus

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

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The Nautilus extension nautilus-gksu is an invaluable enhancement for Ubuntu‘s default file manager. Once installed, it allows you to open files and folders as root or superuser simply by right-clicking and choosing “Open as administrator” from the context-menu.

This is great if you’re in a system folder and decide to edit a config file. Simply double-clicking would bring up the text file in your text editor, but you wouldn’t be able to save any changes. Rather than type the command to let you achieve this in a terminal, you can just right-click it and open it as the administrator.

Similarly, if you are working in a protected folder and need to edit files, move or delete any of the contents, and even copy things into it, open the whole folder with this option, enter your password, and away you go. You will notice any Nautilus windows that appear will not be themed like the rest of your system, as those instances of Nautilus are in fact being controlled by root (if you ever logged in as root, which is never really advised these days, you’d see it has a basic theme and no desktop effects).

This option for folders is really handy, as there are times when even a novice user can benefit from having full access to a system folder. For example, if you’ve downloaded splash themes for GRUB bootloader and the Usplash/XSplash/Plymouth screen that comes after it, it is certainly much quicker and easier to open the appropriate system folder in this manner, then drag-and-drop new themes/splashes in, rather than have to type commands in the terminal to do so for each file.

To install this extension, enter the following into a terminal:

sudo apt-get install nautilus-gksu

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Click here for more Nautilus Extensions!

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Nautilus – the default file manager for Gnome, and therefore Ubuntu – is feature-rich and easy-to-use, but you can make it even more powerful, and with very little effort.

With Windows or Mac OS X, if there are features missing in the built-in file browser, the only option is to install another, usually at some expense (software developers in those worlds haven’t quite embraced the concept of open-source). In Ubuntu and other Linux distributions, other file managers – like Thunar (Xfce), Dolphin (KDE) and Konqueror (KDE) – can easily be installed (for free), even if they were made for a desktop environment other than Gnome.

But another way to get some of the features you might find lacking in Nautilus is to install some plugins or “extensions“, most of which are in the official repos and easily installed via Synaptic Package Manager.

Here I’ll feature the most popular and useful ones, but there are others out there, from adding more integration with messaging to technical tasks most of us don’t need (or understand). While I’ll be keeping this post up to date as new extensions are created, a Google search for “nautilus plugin extension” will reveal those I have left out (or missed). And don’t forget that you can also open Synaptic, paste the word “nautilus” into the Quick search bar, and all extensions available in the repositories will be displayed.

Essential Extensions:

Nautilus Open Terminal: Command-Line in the Current Folder

Nautilus GKSU: Open Files & Folders with Administrative Privileges

More Cool Plugins:

Nautilus Image Converter: Easily Resize & Rotate Pictures

Nautilus Pastebin: Send Text Clips to the Web

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Other Nautilus Enhancements:

Add Buttons for New Folder, Cut, Copy, Paste & Trash/Delete to the Nautilus Toolbar

Add a File/Folder “Properties” Button to the Nautilus Toolbar

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Guide to Customising & Enhancing Nautilus

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A new little extension for Ubuntu‘s file manager is nautilus-pastebin, which is a script written in Python that allows users to upload text-only files to an online pastebin service by simply right-clicking them. Each scrap of text has its own unique URL, which is placed in the clipboard ready for pasting into your web browser (or email if wanting to share the text with the recipient).

Once installed, all you have to do is right-click a text file, choose Pastebin from the context menu, and your text clip is uploaded. A notification should pop up under your system tray informing you where it has been saved to (as mentioned, the address will now be in memory ready for pasting).

To view it, simply paste the URL into your browser’s address bar.

If this seems like something you can do with, install the forementioned package via Synaptic, or enter the following into a terminal:

sudo apt-get install nautilus-pastebin

Users can also customise the extension’s behaviour by using nautilus-pastebin-configurator, an easy-to-use configuration tool that is also installed (just paste the command into a terminal or Alt+F2).

With it you can make the URL automatically open in your web browser, turn the notification on or off, force a confirmation message to appear before uploading the text, and change the pastebin service to another in the list.

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Click here for more Nautilus Extensions!

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

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PLEASE NOTE: This article is for earlier versions of Nautilus File Manager (2.x) found in earlier Ubuntu releases running on Gnome 2.x, so will not work in Unity (the default desktop environment) or Gnome Shell, both of which are based on Gnome 3.

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It’s actually quite easy to add a few more basic buttons to the Nautilus toolbar, which you’ll see if you read this guide for adding Cut, Copy & Paste buttons. To add aPropertiesbutton to save you constantly right-clicking files and folders for more info, simply add the following line to nautilus-navigation-window-ui.xml:

<toolitem name="Properties" action="Properties" />

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Apply New Settings Immediately Without Rebooting

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

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