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Posts Tagged ‘disc tray’

“Failed to eject media; one or more volumes on the media are busy.”

That is an error message you may come across from time to time, and of course the obvious thing to do is make sure no programs are still trying to access a CD or DVD in your disc drive. And this includes programs that aren’t actively using the device, but are nonetheless keeping it “busy”, like if you have a media player open with files or titles from the disc still in its playlist. But once you have ruled all that out, you still might be left with the inability to eject the disc and get on with things, so hopefully some information here will be of use to you.

In most cases, the following command run in a terminal or via Alt+F2 will successfully unmount the disc, and then eject the tray:

sudo umount -l /media/cdrom0 && eject

Please note: since Ubuntu now automagically creates mount points for discs based on the label, /media/cdrom0 may not work for you, so you may need to ascertain the correct path for the current disc with this command:

mount|grep ^'/dev'

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If you’ve come across some commands that require the actual device name of your CD/DVD drive (eg: /dev/dvd), rather than the mount point (eg: /media/cdrom0), it pays to know what it is, as commands won’t work if they’re looking in the wrong place. There are a couple of ways of doing this, and you’ll probably find they give conflicting outputs, but where one is not useful to you, the other will be; for example, if your drive is both /dev/scd0 and /dev/sr0, you might find /dev/sr0 works for most commands, and where it fails /dev/scd0 won’t.

Method 1:

To find out the name of the block device file representing your optical disc drive, enter the following into a terminal, without a disc in the drive:

wodim --devices

The information will be displayed as follows:

wodim: Overview of accessible drives (1 found) :
————————————————————————-
0 dev=’/dev/scd0‘ rwrw-- : ‘ASUS’ ‘DRW-24B1ST’
————————————————————————-

If there is a disc in the tray, you will see the following error, so just eject the disc and run the command again:

wodim: No such file or directory.
Cannot open SCSI driver!
For possible targets try ‘wodim --devices’
or ‘wodim -scanbus’.
For possible transport specifiers try ‘wodim
dev=help’.
For IDE/ATAPI devices configuration,
see the file README.ATAPI.setup from
the wodim documentation.

Method 2:

To find out the name of the block device file representing your optical disc drive, as well as its mount point, enter the following into a terminal:

mount|grep ^'/dev'

The output will look as follows:

/dev/sda3 on / type ext4 (rw)
/dev/sda1 on /media/Windows XP type fuseblk (rw,nosuid,nodev,allow_other,blksize=4096)
/dev/sr0 on /media/cdrom0 type iso9660 (ro,noexec,nosuid,nodev,unhide,user=ozzman)


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Here is funny way to turn your computer into a baby rocker, using your disc tray! What the following command does is continually opens and closes the CD/DVD tray, so you can either move the rocker in close so it ends up getting pushed a little each time the tray opens, or tie some string from the rocker handle to the tray.

while :; do eject ; eject -t ; done

You can check out a YouTube vid of it being done via the latter method (though the guy uses his own script). Don’t forget that if you would like to download this video clip, copy the url and paste it into QtTube for downloading to your Videos folder.

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PLEASE NOTE: This article is for earlier versions of Ubuntu running on Gnome 2.x, so you will not be able to add this to the panel in Unity (the default desktop environment) or Gnome Shell, both of which are based on Gnome 3. You can, however, make desktop launchers, or find other ways to execute the eject command. If using Gnome “Classic” or KDE, you can still add eject and close buttons to your panel.

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While the eject command obviously ejects the disc tray, many are stumped when it comes to the opposite: a command to close the disc tray. It is quite simply eject -t, but you can get the equivalent and much more if you install the package cdtool. It is a collection of command-line tools for your disc drive, and the one you are after is cdclose. You can then make a launcher for your panel (for either eject -t or cdclose) to add next to your eject button.

For those interested in some extra tools for their disc drive, all the commands you get in the cdtool metapackage are:

cdctrl   cdloop   cdadd   cdown   cdtool2cddb
cdplay   cdpause   cdstop   cdclose   cdeject
cdir   cdinfo   cdreset   cdvolume   cdshuffle

To find out a bit of info on usage on each, just enter the command in a terminal, followed by a space and -h (for Help). To close the disc tray, all you need is the cdclose command.

To install, either open Synaptic and mark cdtool for installation, or paste the following into a terminal:

sudo apt-get install cdtool

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PLEASE NOTE: This article is for earlier versions of Ubuntu running on Gnome 2.x, so will not work in Unity (the default desktop environment) or Gnome Shell, both of which are based on Gnome 3. This will, however, still work in Gnome 3 “Classic” (Fallback/Flashback Mode), but where you are instructed to right-click the panel, you will have to hold either the Alt or Super/Windows key (or both, in some cases) while right-clicking.

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To make a launcher for your panel, you can either make a desktop launcher and drag it to your panel (where a copy of it will appear), or create it with a built-in feature of the panel as follows.

Right-click an empty area of your panel, and choose Add to Panel. At the top of the app that appears you will see Custom Application Launcher, so select it then click +Add.

You will see firstly there is the Type; just leave it as Application. For Name, put something descriptive that will be the tooltip that will be displayed when you hover your mouse over it. For an example, we’ll use the eject command, so for Name put something like Eject Disc. For Command, simply put eject, and for Comment, something like Eject the DVD Tray.

Note that the command can have options after it without the need to enclose it all in quotes or anything. Also, depending on the command, you may need to change the Type to Application in Terminal if you find nothing happens when you click the launcher.

Before you click OK, you’ll see a generic icon which you can click on to select one of your own choice to replace it. It should display some basic system icons to choose from, but you can always Browse to a folder where you keep your favourites.

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To make a launcher, simply right-click an empty area of your desktop, and choose Create Launcher. You will see firstly there is the Type; just leave it as Application. For Name, put something descriptive that will be the caption you see beneath it on your desktop (and if you plan to add it to your panel as well, it will be displayed as a tooltip when you hover your mouse over it). For an example, we’ll use the eject command, so for Name put something like Eject Disc. For Command, simply put eject, and for Comment, something like Eject the DVD Tray.

Note that the command can have options after it without the need to enclose it all in quotes or anything. Also, depending on the command, you may need to change the Type to Application in Terminal if you find nothing happens when you click the launcher.

Before you click OK, you’ll see a generic icon which you can click on to select one of your own choice to replace it. It should display some basic system icons to choose from, but you can always Browse to a folder where you keep your favourites. Note that if you drag it to your panel, the copy that appears there may have reverted back to the default icon, so you’ll need to reset it.

For a guide to making launchers directly on the panel, click here.

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PLEASE NOTE: This article is for earlier versions of Ubuntu running on Gnome 2.x, so you will not be able to add this to the panel in Unity (the default desktop environment) or Gnome Shell, both of which are based on Gnome 3. You can, however, make desktop launchers, or find other ways to execute the eject command. If using Gnome “Classic” or KDE, you can still add eject and close buttons to your panel.

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Here’s a little tip many newbies might not know: there is a Linux command eject which opens your disc tray, and you can make a button for it on your panel. It is included in Ubuntu by default, so all you need to do is make a launcher for it (with eject as the Command) and add it to your panel.

You can also find out how to add a CLOSE button.

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

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