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Posts Tagged ‘Chrome’

If you’ve been getting blue faces when watching YouTube clips, or any other Adobe Flash videos, the cause can be hard to pinpoint. When faces and flames, and other red/orange elements, turn varying shades of blue, it can be due to a buggy Flash update (especially for 64-bit users), or it can be due to video card driver issues (currently it seems to be affects a few Nvidia users after upgrading to Ubuntu 12.04 – read more at the bottom). Whatever the cause, this issue usually drives people to uninstall Flash, then reinstall an earlier version.

But hopefully the following fix will correct the colours in the movies you watch in Firefox or Chrome (and any other web browsers) without having to resort to such drastic measures. All you need to do is create a text file and paste a line of text into it, but since saving it will fail unless you create the folder first, do so by running the following in the terminal:

sudo mkdir /etc/adobe/

Now to create the file and open it for editing:

gksu gedit /etc/adobe/mms.cfg

When it opens, paste in the following:

EnableLinuxHWVideoDecode=1

Close the file, and confirm you want to save the changes. Now, all you need to do is restart your browser and your clips should look fine. If not, you may need to reboot, and hopefully all is fine when you return.

The EASY WAY: Now that you understand what’s needed, you could cheat and just do the whole process with one command:

sudo mkdir /etc/adobe/ && echo -e "EnableLinuxHWVideoDecode=1" | sudo tee /etc/adobe/mms.cfg > /dev/null

If you also want to force the Flash player to bypass its GPU validity checks (GPU validation – see below), then the command would be:

sudo mkdir /etc/adobe/ && echo -e "OverrideGPUValidation=1\nEnableLinuxHWVideoDecode=1" | sudo tee /etc/adobe/mms.cfg > /dev/null

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That Didn’t Work, or Caused Problems? In some cases, you might find you need to disable GPU validation in addition to, or instead of, telling Flash to use vdpau hardware acceleration. If you’re experiencing trouble at some sites but not others (like YouTube videos are now fine, but at Vimeo the Flash plugin crashes), you may want to play around with the settings. For example, to enable the acceleration but bypass GPU validation, the text in mms.cfg would be:

OverrideGPUValidation=1
EnableLinuxHWVideoDecode=1

… or the following to just bypass GPU validation:

OverrideGPUValidation=1
EnableLinuxHWVideoDecode=0

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To Revert Back: If these tweaks have caused you more headache than it was worth, just delete the entire folder you created with:

sudo rm -r /etc/adobe

Or you can just edit the file with:

gksu gedit /etc/adobe/mms.cfg

… and set EnableLinuxHWVideoDecode= to 0 if you prefer to keep it.

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Nvidia users: Apparently the issue (which Adobe reportedly won’t be fixing) is caused by having hardware acceleration enabled, so right-clicking a Flash video, choosing Settings… and disabling “Enable hardware acceleration” can often fix this. However, the above fix is perhaps more elegant since you’re allowing Flash to use vdpau hardware acceleration, rather than just disabling it altogether.

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When Google Chrome first came out for Windows, people were hacking .dll files to change the theme. Now, with theme support, many still find they can’t reliably switch between installed themes, but have to install them again from the download page. This is certainly true of the Linux version (at least in Ubuntu), as the Extensions page tells you none are installed.

I’ve seen talk from Windows users of finding all the installed themes in an extensions folder, but currently in the Linux version you will not only find that there is no .crx file (the extension of the themes) belonging to this program to be found anywhere, but no file at all with the name/prefix of the installed theme.

When you choose to install a theme, it gets downloaded as usual, but then disappears from your ~/Downloads folder once it is installed.

So the way around this is not to click any Install buttons, but to right-click them and choose Save Link As. Then just save each desired theme where you can easily find them all, like a new folder called ~/Downloads/Google Chrome Themes. Note that if you’re at a gallery page with previews of lots of themes, you’ll need to go to each theme’s page and right-click the Install button there (otherwise you’ll be downloading .html web pages, not a .crx themes).

Once you’ve downloaded some, all you need to do is drag one and drop it anywhere on Google Chrome. You will see a confirmation appear at the bottom left, so click the Continue button to proceed with changing the theme.

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Read also:

Make Google Chrome Look Like the Rest of Ubuntu

Google Chrome Themes for Ubuntu Users

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

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Google Chrome is a fast, lightweight web browser, and while it looks good, and there are many cool themes for it, you may prefer it to look like all your other programs. But you can in fact force Google Chrome to display a normal titlebar and window borders, that is themed like the rest of your system, whether it be by GTK+/Metacity or Compiz-Fusion/Emerald.

Simply go to the settings button and choose Options from the menu, and in the Personal Stuff tab check Use system title bar and borders under Appearance. Above it you can also click the Use GTK+ theme button, and the rest of Google Chrome will be themed with the colours, textures and buttons of your current system theme.

To restore the titlebar and windows borders if you make these changes and decide to revert, checkHide system title bar and use compact borders. To let Google Chrome look after the rest of the decorating, you can click the Use Classic theme button, or just install another theme. If you want to change between installed themes, read this.

See also:

Google Chrome Themes for Ubuntu Users

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

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Google Chrome is a fast and lightweight web browser that has already become the 3rd most used browser on the planet. OK, so at 4.4% of the market it isn’t threatening to topple Mozilla Firefox or Microsoft Internet Explorer, but it has pushed my beloved Opera out of that position in a fairly short time.

Basically, it is a very slimmed-down browser with less screen real estate being taken up by things like a menu bar, and in independent tests has proven to be much faster than other browsers. For this speed boost, Google employs its own technology which many experts claim have Mozilla and Microsoft scrambling to match, let alone better.

Also, security is something the developers take very seriously, and once again has proved equal or superior than its counterparts in independent tests.

For more detailed technical info and browser comparisons, just search online with your favourite search engine (funnily enough, Google comes to mind), but you can check out the Wikipedia article for a good introduction.

To install Google Chrome, simply go to the download page and specify either 32- or 64-bit Ubuntu, and proceed to download the .deb installer. You’ll notice at the bottom of the user agreement it says:

Note: Installing Google Chrome will add the Google repository so your system will automatically keep Google Chrome up to date. If you don’t want Google’s repository, do “sudo touch /etc/default/google-chrome” before installing the package.

Note that simply downloading the installer won’t do this, but the repos will be added during installation. And you may notice that if you don’t want the repos added, there is a command outlined to prevent this, though I would suggest you let Google Chrome update itself, to keep it stable and secure.

Once you’ve downloaded the file, double-click it to proceed with the install.

In the first dialogue that appears when you start Google Chrome for the first time, you’ll see you can import settings from your browser. If you have Firefox, then this is simple, but if you have another installed, like Opera, then it may not appear in the list (in my case, I have multiple web browsers, and only Firefox was available to import from).

You’ll also notice you can have crash information sent back to the Google developers; the default (surprisingly) is not to send any info, but if you plan to keep using it and want to help improve stability and performance, you might consider enabling this before proceeding.

If you have Firefox open, it will complain that it could not import settings due to this. Simply close Firefox, then click the Continue button to proceed with importing your Firefox settings, bookmarks and passwords.

When Google Chrome finishes loading, it will likely open your Firefox “Home” page as the first tab, as well as an introductory page for the program itself. If you look to the first pic, you’ll see it also grabs any links you added to Firefox toolbars.

When you click the + button at the end of the tabs to open a new tab, you will find a customisable page for links which is similar to Opera‘s Speed Dial. Unlike the latter, however, you can’t really add new links at will, as it is more like a history of most frequently visited pages, but you can remove thumbnails for those you don’t want there (and also Keep on this page any you want there permanently). It’s worth spending a few minutes customising this page (once you’ve surfed a few sites), as it can be quicker than opening a blank tab and then finding the link in your Bookmarks menu, like you’d do in Firefox when opening a frequently used page.

And if you’re wondering where your imported bookmarks got to, just click on the Other Bookmarks button on the far right.

When you go to your favourite sites, you’ll see any login information would have been imported, and you’ll be ready to log into Facebook, MySpace or eBay with a click.

And if you’re wondering about customisability, while the window border obviously does not use your GTK or Compiz/Emerald theme, note that you can skin Google Chrome with the many themes available, like you can do with Firefox and Opera, as well as install all sorts of useful extensions. Once the browser is installed, go to the settings/spanner button to the far right of the address bar (it will say “Customize and control Google Chrome” when you hover your cursor over it), choose Extensions from the menu, and on the page that appears telling you you have none, click the browse the gallery link to look for goodies to install (use the Search field to look for theme and skin if you just want to change the look and not wade through hundreds of other extensions).

As you can see, it is no major pain setting up Google Chrome, and currently is just a 12.8Mb download, so you may want to give it a try, even if you just want a backup browser in case Firefox misbehaves and you don’t want to reboot. And if you’ve been having issues with your browser, or just prefer something more lightweight yet full-featured, this just may be what you’ve been looking for.

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Note: Currently the Linux version is still a “beta”, but on my 64-bit Ubuntu 9.10 “Karmic Koala” system, seems perfectly stable.

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ADDITIONAL INFO:

Make Google Chrome Look Like the Rest of Ubuntu

Change Between Installed Themes in Linux

Google Chrome Themes for Ubuntu Users

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

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