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Posts Tagged ‘buttons’

Please note: this guide is for Ubuntu 10.10 backwards, as Emerald is no longer supported by Ubuntu. If you have upgraded to 11.04, Emerald will still the there, but the themes will be useless unless you uninstall Emerald and reinstall a version compatible with the latest Compiz-Fusion. If you have Emerald running successfully in 11.04 onwards, then this guide will still apply to you. Otherwise, read the guide for restoring window borders in 11.04 onwards.

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Once in a while, you might find that when you boot to your desktop, the title-bars to all your windows are missing, along with the control buttons (Minimize, Maximize and Close).

While many wouldn’t know any way around this situation other than a reboot, others will be aware of the fusion-icon package that lets you reload your window manager. Once installed, it can be found in Applications > System Tools > Compiz Fusion Icon, and when launched you’ll find its icon in the system tray. Simply right-click it and choose the Reload Window Manager option, and Compiz-Fusion will be forced to restart, and your title-bars will reappear with the Emerald theme currently in use.

But there is actually a much easier way to go about this, and it is as simple as pasting the following command into a terminal or via Alt+F2:

emerald --replace

This just reloads Emerald, which is all that is needed to get your title-bars back. As you can see, this is much quicker than using the Compiz Fusion Icon, and means you don’t have to worry about installing the fusion-icon package if it’s not already on your system.

But there is an even easier way to do this, and that is create a launcher for it. You can put it anywhere you like, like the desktop or on the panel, but if you’re worried about clicking it accidentally, or just want it out of the way until needed, you can add a drawer to your panel and stick it in that.

The command for the launcher is exactly the same as for the terminal, and you can name it something like Reload Emerald/Compiz. Then all you have to do from then onwards is click your launcher and watch your title-bars bounce back.

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PLEASE NOTE: This article is for earlier versions of Ubuntu running on Gnome 2.x, so will not work in Unity (the default desktop environment) or Gnome Shell, both of which are based on Gnome 3.

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If you’ve created custom toolbar buttons for Ubuntu’s file manager, Nautilus, you might find them gone after a system upgrade. This is simply because the file nautilus-navigation-window-ui.xml has been overwritten with a fresh copy with default settings.

To save having to edit that file each time this happens, you can backup the edited file by copying it somewhere safe, which you can do quickly via the terminal. Then when you need to restore your settings, another command will quickly do this for you.

In the example, nautilus-navigation-window-ui.xml will be copied to a folder called Settings inside your home folder, but you can change that to whatever you like.

Backup Modified Nautilus Settings

sudo cp /usr/share/nautilus/ui/nautilus-navigation-window-ui.xml ~/Settings/nautilus-navigation-window-ui.xml

Restore Modified Nautilus Settings

sudo cp ~/Settings/nautilus-navigation-window-ui.xml /usr/share/nautilus/ui/nautilus-navigation-window-ui.xml

For the changes to take effect, you’ll need to restart Nautilus, which you can do with:

nautilus -q

in a terminal or via Alt+F2.

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K3b is an excellent disc burning program with lots of features, and one of those is the ability to customise the quick start pane that is shown when there is no open project.

The 2 default buttons are New Audio CD Project and New Data Project, but you can add more to these, or replace them with whatever you please. As an example, I’ll show you how to add a button for movie DVDs while removing the rarely-used audio CD button.

To add a new button, you can right-click any existing button, and from the Add Button menu choose your option.

Alternatively, just right-click anywhere in that pane (other than on a button) and automatically the Add Button menu is displayed. Simply click on your choice and a button for it will be added to the end (right of existing buttons).

To remove a button, simply right-click it and choose Remove Button, and it will be gone from sight. Note that you cannot delete the More actions… button (which is actually a good thing).

As I said, you can add as many buttons as you want. In fact, you can pretty much eliminate the need to go back into the More actions... menu ever again.

However, if you want to keep it neat and tidy, and only really use a couple of options – like burning data discs and movie DVDs – just display buttons for those.

As you can see, it is incredibly easy to tailor K3b‘s quick start pane to your needs, so set it up how you want and you will rarely ever need to click More actions… again.

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Click here for all K3b tips

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PLEASE NOTE: This article was written for earlier versions of Nautilus File Manager (2.x) found in earlier Ubuntu releases running on Gnome 2.x, so most of the cosmetic customisations (background/colours and custom toolbar buttons) will not work in Unity (the default desktop environment) or Gnome Shell, both of which are based on Gnome 3. However, the guides for plugins/extensions are still valid, as well as most of the tips for getting more out of Nautilus. Tricks that will only work in legacy versions are marked “Gnome 2 Only“.

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Nautilus is the default file manager for Gnome-based Linux distros like Ubuntu, and has many great features while being easy-to-use for newbies.

But you can make it even more useful, and even more attractive, without too much effort or fuss. So what you’ll find here are links to various articles in this blog dedicated to this task, split up into sections for easier browsing.

While cosmetic alterations and enhancements are some tricks you might try for the fun of it, other tips offer far more usability than you may have thought possible in Nautilus, and may even be the answers to features you’ve been longing to see in the list of your file browser’s capabilities.

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Nautilus Toolbar Enhancements:

Add Toolbar Buttons for New Folder, Cut, Copy, Paste & Trash/Delete (Gnome 2 Only)

Add a File/Folder “Properties” Button to the Nautilus Toolbar (Gnome 2 Only)

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Essential Nautilus Extensions:

Nautilus Open Terminal: Command-Line in the Current Folder

Nautilus GKSU: Open Files & Folders with Administrative Privileges

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More Cool Nautilus Plugins:

Nautilus Image Converter: Easily Resize & Rotate Pictures

Nautilus Image Resizer Extension

Open Selected Folders in New Windows with Nautilus-Actions

Nautilus-Actions: Open in New Window

Open Selected Folder in Image Viewer or Movie Player with Nautilus-Actions

Nautilus-Actions: Adding Movie Player/Videos to Context Menu (DONE!)

Nautilus Pastebin: Send Text Clips to the Web

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Cosmetic Alterations to Nautilus:

Change Background/Colour/Gradient & Assign File/Folder Emblems (Gnome 2 Only)

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Tweaking Nautilus Settings:

Show Hidden Files by Default in Nautilus

Show Text-Entry Address Bar or “Breadcrumbs” (Buttons)

Enable Split-Pane File Browsing (Gnome 2 Only)

Nautilus Thumbnails: Zoom In or Out with Your Mouse

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Applying New Settings:

Apply New Settings Immediately Without Rebooting

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File Management Tricks:

Change File Icon & Permissions + Default Program for a File Extension

Add Program to List of Applications in “Open With” When Right-Clicking Files in Nautilus

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With the release of Ubuntu 10.04Lucid Lynx” came the move to a new default theme, one which has the control buttons on the left (like in Mac OS X) rather than the right (the previous default, and a layout Windows users are familiar with).

If you really don’t like the control buttons on the left, it’s easy enough to remedy by switching themes to one with buttons on the right. But if you like the current theme, just not the button layout, you can actually hack the settings and put the buttons where you want.

To achieve this, you can simply copy and paste the command at the end of this article into a terminal, or if you prefer the hands-on approach, do the following:

Open Applications > System Tools > Configuration Editor (or Alt+F2 and enter gconf-editor). Once open, browse to /apps/metacity/general/, and in the right pane you will notice the option “button_layout”, with its value set as close,minimize,maximize:menu.

Simply change the value to menu:minimize,maximize,close. As soon as you hit Enter to commit the changes, the buttons will leap to the right-hand side.

Also, you can remove the window menu from the opposite side, simply by leaving out the word menu:

:minimize,maximize,close (make sure to include the colon at the beginning).

You can even add a spacer (or more), simply by including the word spacer in there. For example, if you just want a spacer between the maximize and close buttons, you would change the value to menu:minimize,maximize,spacer,close.

You can apply these tricks to any GTK+/Metacity theme in use, and put buttons in whatever order you desire. And Mac users who want buttons on the left can use any of the countless themes with right-side buttons and simply change that theme’s settings to close,minimize,maximize:menu, or close,minimize,maximize: if the window menu is unwanted (make sure to include the colon at the end).

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Now that you’ve seen the “user-friendly” hands-on method of doing this, here’s a command you can paste in a terminal instead:

gconftool-2 -t str --set /apps/metacity/general/button_layout “menu:minimize,maximize,close”

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The only restrictions are: “Duplicate buttons are not allowed. Unknown button names are silently ignored so that buttons can be added in future metacity versions without breaking older versions.

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If you’ve upgraded your system to 10.04Lucid Lynx“, then you may have noticed one of two possible things with the “Location Bar” in Nautilus: you either only have “breadcrumbs” (those navigation buttons above the folder contents) or an “address bar” where you can enter text to browse to another folder. There used to be a very handy toggle button to the left, but in their infinite wisdom the developers have chosen to remove it.

Most disgruntled users seem to be complaining that they’re left with “ugly” and “useless” breadcrumbs, whereas they’d prefer to have the address bar, so they can type addresses. For me and many others, it was the other way around, as those breadcrumbs are invaluable for jumping back or forward many folders with one click, and the address bar is occasionally handy for typing or pasting in a path. Actually, I was constantly using the toggle button, since while breadcrumbs were fine for much of my browsing, I did a lot of copying of folder paths for various tasks, as well as pasting paths to system folders for system hacks I found online.

Since there is no longer a toggle button, users with only breadcrumbs will need to hit Ctrl+L to show the text-entry address bar (and Esc to go back to breadcrumbs) You can also hit the / key and it will show the address bar, but empty (well, except for it beginning with “/“), ready for you to type or paste an address (so if you want to copy the address of the current folder, use Ctrl+L). Note that once you refresh a window, it will go back to breadcrumbs, so if you want to make it stick as the default, use the tip at the end of this article.

If you’re stuck with the address bar, you might find Ctrl+L does nothing to bring back your beloved breadcrumbs. For this, you’ll have to hack a Gnome setting, so open Applications > System Tools > Configuration Editor (or Alt+F2 and enter gconf-editor). Once open, browse to /apps/nautilus/preferences/, and in the right pane you will notice the option “always_use_location_entry”, so untick that to reset it to breadcrumbs. You can then use Ctrl+L for when you need the address bar, and click the Reload button to get back the breadcrumbs once finished. Note that currently clicking Reload doesn’t always bring back the breadcrumbs, but if you browse to another folder, or use your Back/Forward buttons, the “Location Bar” will then be reset.

For those wanting to make the address bar view the default, you’ll find that there is no tick next to “always_use_location_entry”, so when you tick it your “Location Bar” will be a text-entry address bar from then onwards.

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If you’d like it to default to location entry (address bar), you can always take the easy option and paste the following command into a terminal:

gconftool-2 --set /apps/nautilus/preferences/always_use_location_entry --type=bool

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Did this information make your day? Did it rescue you from hours of headache? Then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or some fish’n’chips for my time and effort! Many thanks!

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