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Archive for the ‘Toolbars’ Category

Caja is a great file-manager, but one unfortunate limitation is that you can’t customise the toolbar in the Preferences dialogue, like you can in Nemo (though it’s worth noting that you’re very limited in the buttons you can add in Nemo). However, you can in fact add new buttons to Caja’s toolbar, and a whole bunch of them at that, as well as reorder the buttons, and remove unwanted ones, and I’ll show you how. So just click on the links below, and soon you’ll be populating your toolbar with all the handy buttons you could need!

Copy, Cut & Paste

Create New Folder

“Open New Tab” & “Open New Window”

Open Trash, Move to Trash, Delete & Empty Trash

Undo & Redo

File/Folder Properties

“Open in Terminal” Button?

The Open in Terminal context-menu option is provided by the extension caja-open-terminal (which also gets installed with the caja-extensions package), so you cannot add a toolbar button for it (as it’s not built into Caja). However, I have an even better solution: open the terminal in the current folder with the F4 key!

Network Locations

Clear History

Add Bookmark

“Preferences”, “Templates”, “Backgrounds and Emblems”& “Rename”

See also:

Add/Remove Separators & Reorder/Remove Buttons

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Caja is a great file manager, and like most Linux file managers, you can use the Back/Previous and Forward/Next buttons at the beginning of the toolbar to navigate between folders you’ve been in during that session. And if you ever want to clear the history of visited folders, it’s as easy as opening the Go menu and clicking Clear History. But if you’re a power user of the history feature, and are constantly clearing it to unclutter the locations visited, then you may have thought a toolbar button for that would be handy.

But one unfortunate limitation is that you can’t customise the toolbar in the Preferences dialogue. However, you can in fact add new buttons, and remove unwanted ones, and I’ll show you how.

It comes down to specifying toolitems in the config file caja-navigation-window-ui.xml, and wherever you paste the code will determine where the button ends up. For example, if you add the code for your custom button after the entry for the Home button, that’s where it will end up; if you add it after all the default buttons, it will end up on the right end of the toolbar. So you can add your buttons where you want, reorder them as you please, and even get rid of unwanted ones.

Add “Clear History” Button

As you can see by the screenshot above, it creates a comparatively large button in the toolbar, because it displays the full Clear History label (and that can’t be changed), but if you’ve got plenty of toolbar space, and really want that button, then let’s proceed. First off, open the file for editing with the following command:

pluma admin:///usr/share/caja/ui/caja-navigation-window-ui.xml

The second half of the file deals with the toolbar, so locate the button you want to put your custom ones after. Hit Enter at the end of that line, and paste the code below into the empty paragraph beneath it, making sure to preserve the indent. For this example, I’m adding the code after the Search button, but you can add it wherever you please.

<toolitem name="Clear History" action="Clear History"/>

Once you’ve added your custom button, save the file, then reload Caja (either by manually closing all windows, or running caja -q in the terminal, then opening Caja again). Your new toolbar button will be there and ready to use!

For info on how to Add or Remove Separators, Reorder Existing Buttons, and Remove Unwanted Buttons, check out this guide!

See also: Full List of Available Caja Toolbar Buttons

☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻

The tutorial above is TOTALLY FREE, and I hope you found it useful! But if this information really made your day, because it rescued you from hours of headache, or allowed you to accomplish something you thought was impossible, then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or pizza for my time and effort! Many thanks in advance!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

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Caja is a great file-manager, but one unfortunate limitation is that you can’t customise the toolbar in the Preferences dialogue. So, while there buttons for Home and Computer, there isn’t one for Network Locations, which some of you might find handy. However, you can in fact add new buttons, and remove unwanted ones, and I’ll show you how.

It comes down to specifying toolitems in the config file caja-navigation-window-ui.xml, and wherever you paste the code will determine where the button ends up. For example, if you add the code for your custom button after the entry for the Home button, that’s where it will end up; if you add it after all the default buttons, it will end up on the right end of the toolbar. So you can add your buttons where you want, reorder them as you please, and even get rid of unwanted ones.

Adding Network Locations Button

First off, open the file for editing with the following command:

pluma admin:///usr/share/caja/ui/caja-navigation-window-ui.xml

The second half of the file deals with the toolbar, so locate the button you want to put your custom ones after. Hit Enter at the end of that line, and paste the code below into the empty paragraph beneath it, making sure to preserve the indent. For this example, I’m adding the code after the Computer button, but you can add it wherever you please.

<toolitem name="Go to Network" action="Go to Network"/>

Once you’ve added your custom button, save the file, then reload Caja (either by manually closing all windows, or running caja -q in the terminal, then opening Caja again). Your new toolbar button will be there and ready to use!

For info on how to Add or Remove Separators, Reorder Existing Buttons, and Remove Unwanted Buttons, check out this guide!

See also: Full List of Available Caja Toolbar Buttons

☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻

The tutorial above is TOTALLY FREE, and I hope you found it useful! But if this information really made your day, because it rescued you from hours of headache, or allowed you to accomplish something you thought was impossible, then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or pizza for my time and effort! Many thanks in advance!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

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Caja is a great file-manager, but one unfortunate limitation is that you can’t customise the toolbar in the Preferences dialogue. And one pair of buttons many would find invaluable are those for Undo and Redo, but they’re not part of the default toolbar. However, you can in fact add new buttons, and remove unwanted ones, and I’ll show you how.

It comes down to specifying toolitems in the config file caja-navigation-window-ui.xml, and wherever you paste the code will determine where the buttons end up. For example, if you add the code for your custom buttons after the entry for the Home button, that’s where they will end up; if you add them after all the default buttons, they will end up on the right end of the toolbar. So you can add your buttons where you want, reorder them as you please, and even get rid of unwanted ones.

Adding Undo and Redo Buttons

First off, open the file for editing with the following command:

pluma admin:///usr/share/caja/ui/caja-navigation-window-ui.xml

The second half of the file deals with the toolbar, so locate the button you want to put your custom ones after. Hit Enter at the end of that line, and paste the code below into the empty paragraph beneath it, making sure to preserve the indent. For this example, I’m adding the code after the Computer button, but you can add it wherever you please.

<toolitem name="Undo" action="Undo"/>
<toolitem name="Redo" action="Redo"/>

Once you’ve added your custom buttons, save the file, then reload Caja (either by manually closing all windows, or running caja -q in the terminal, then opening Caja again). Your new toolbar buttons will be there and ready to use!

For info on how to Add or Remove Separators, Reorder Existing Buttons, and Remove Unwanted Buttons, check out this guide!

See also: Full List of Available Caja Toolbar Buttons

☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻

The tutorial above is TOTALLY FREE, and I hope you found it useful! But if this information really made your day, because it rescued you from hours of headache, or allowed you to accomplish something you thought was impossible, then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or pizza for my time and effort! Many thanks in advance!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

Read Full Post »

Caja is a great file-manager, and unlike Nautilus it still has a toolbar, but one limitation is that you can’t customise the toolbar in the Preferences dialogue. However, you can in fact add new buttons, and remove unwanted ones, and I’ll show you how.

It comes down to specifying toolitems in the config file caja-navigation-window-ui.xml, and wherever you paste the code will determine where the buttons end up. For example, if you add the code for your custom buttons after the entry for the Home button, that’s where they will end up; if you add them after all the default buttons, they will end up on the right end of the toolbar. So you can add your buttons where you want, reorder them as you please, and even get rid of unwanted ones.

And here I’ll show you how to add 4 different buttons related to the deleting of files and managing the Trash/Rubbish/Bin (the naming of that folder can vary: in most screenshots of Caja I’ve seen it is Trash, whereas when I first installed Caja in KDE it was Bin, but when I log into my MATE desktop it’s displayed as Rubbish – so I’ll go with Trash in this tutorial, especially since that’s the term used in the code we’ll be adding).

Caja Toolbar Button to Open Trash/Rubbish Folder

These will be Open Trash, Move To Trash, Delete (bypass Trash and completely delete), and Empty Trash.

Caja Toolbar Button to Move Items to Trash/Rubbish

While it’s easy enough to hit the Delete key to move files and folders to the Trash, and to totally delete them it’s just Shift+Delete, having buttons for these can save you reaching for the keyboard if you’ve just selected files/folders with your mouse (I’ve found the Delete button to be more useful than I imagined). And while you can right-click Trash in Caja’s sidebar and choose Open, Open in New Tab, Open in New Window, and Empty Trash, having a button to open it in the current tab – or middle-click that button to open the Trash folder in a new tab (very handy!) – is quicker, and I’ve found the ability to empty the Trash simply by clicking a button to be extremely useful.

Adding the Delete & Various Trash Buttons

Caja Toolbar Button to Completely DELETE Items, Bypassing Trash/Rubbish

Here I’ll show you how to add all 4 buttons, but you can of course leave out buttons you have no use for, as well as rearrange their order. Personally, I don’t have one for Move to Trash (simply “Trash” in the code below), as hitting the delete key is quicker, but having one for Delete saves me from using both hands to hit the Shift+Delete combo. I middle-click the Open Trash button (“Go to Trash”) to open it in a new tab quite often, but leave that out if you don’t think you’ll use it. But most of us will probably find being able to Empty Trash via a toolbar button to be quite handy.

Caja Toolbar Button to Empty Trash/Rubbish

First off, open the file for editing with the following command:

pluma admin:///usr/share/caja/ui/caja-navigation-window-ui.xml

The second half of the file deals with the toolbar, so locate the button you want to put your custom ones after. Hit Enter at the end of that line, and paste the code below into the empty paragraph beneath it, making sure to preserve the indent (if pasting the whole block at once, you’ll need to hit the spacebar a few times before the second line onwards so the indents line up).

<toolitem name="Go to Trash" action="Go to Trash"/>
<toolitem name="Trash" action="Trash"/>
<toolitem name="Delete" action="Delete"/>
<toolitem name="Empty Trash" action="Empty Trash"/>

Personally, I put these near the end of the toolbar, but you can add them wherever you please.

Code for Caja Toolbar Buttons

Once you’ve added your custom buttons, save the file, then reload Caja (either by manually closing all windows, or running caja -q in the terminal, then opening Caja again). Your new toolbar buttons will be there and ready to use!

For info on how to Add or Remove Separators, Reorder Existing Buttons, and Remove Unwanted Buttons, check out this guide!

See also: Full List of Available Caja Toolbar Buttons

☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻

The tutorial above is TOTALLY FREE, and I hope you found it useful! But if this information really made your day, because it rescued you from hours of headache, or allowed you to accomplish something you thought was impossible, then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or pizza for my time and effort! Many thanks in advance!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

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I think we can all agree that Caja is the best file-manager for Linux, being fast and easy to use, and retaining all those useful things the Gnome developers keep removing from Nautilus. And another awesome thing about Caja is how much you can customise it… though you can be forgiven for not knowing this, since the options available in Preferences are very few indeed.

However, you can in fact tailor Caja to your liking in many ways (check out my posts about adding all sorts of useful toolbar buttons!), and here we’ll be looking at how to add or remove separators in the toolbar, and how to reorder existing buttons, and remove unwanted ones.

First off, open Caja’s config file for editing with the following command:

pluma admin:///usr/share/caja/ui/caja-navigation-window-ui.xml

The second half of the file deals with the toolbar, where you will see toolitem and separator entries, so let’s get started!

Adding & Removing Separators

If you want to add a separator anywhere, just add hit Enter after the preceding line, and insert <separator/> into the black paragraph, making sure to preserve the indent. Or if you want the reverse, to remove a separator, then delete that line (or you can comment it out – see Removing Unwanted Toolbar Buttons below). In this way you can add more separators, reorder them, or remove them entirely.

Reordering Caja’s Toolbar Buttons

If you want to reorder your buttons to your liking, it’s as easy as moving around the lines of code. As you can see in the picture above, I’ve switched around the lines of code for Home and Computer, so the Computer button comes before Home:

It’s as easy as that – you can have your toolbar buttons in any order you please simply by moving the lines of code around. Now to get rid of those buttons you can really do without…

Removing Unwanted Toolbar Buttons

If there are default toolbar buttons you can do without, simply delete the lines for them. Or, if you’d prefer to comment them out, just in case you want them back one day, note that being an .xml file, you can’t use a hash (#) to comment out lines like with scripts and other config files – that results in the entire toolbar disappearing. The correct syntax for XML files is to start the line off with a less-than symbol followed by an exclamation point and two dashes (<!--), then end the line with two dashes followed by a greater-than symbol (-->). In the following example, I’m commenting out the “Stop” button (which is useless in my opinion, and just taking up valuable space), and note that since there is already a greater-than symbol (>) at the end, all you need to do is insert two dashes (--) before it:

<!--	<toolitem name="Stop" action="Stop"/-->

You will see in the file that the line has been successfully commented out:

Saving Your Toolbar Tweaks

Once you’ve finished your toolbar customisations, save the file, then reload Caja, either by manually closing all windows, or running caja -q via Run Command or in the terminal, then opening Caja again.

So I hope this has been of use to you, and if you’d like to add a bunch of really useful new buttons not available by default, check out my other posts!

See also: Full List of Available Caja Toolbar Buttons

☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻

The tutorial above is TOTALLY FREE, and I hope you found it useful! But if this information really made your day, because it rescued you from hours of headache, or allowed you to accomplish something you thought was impossible, then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or pizza for my time and effort! Many thanks in advance!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

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As with any Linux file-manager, if you want to find out the properties of selected files and folders, you just need to hit Alt+Enter, or right-click and choose Properties . But if you’re selecting items with your mouse, it makes sense to have a toolbar button for this task, so you can quickly and easily click that, rather than have to initiate it via a key-combo. That way you can easily get information about the folder you’re in (if nothing is selected) or the selected file(s) and/or folder(s).

But one limitation of Caja is that you can’t customise the toolbar in the Preferences dialogue. However, you can in fact add new buttons, and remove unwanted ones, and I’ll show you how.

It comes down to specifying toolitems in the config file caja-navigation-window-ui.xml, and wherever you paste the code will determine where the button ends up. For example, if you add the code for your custom button after the entry for the Home button, that’s where it will end up; if you add it after all the default buttons, it will end up on the right end of the toolbar. So you can add your buttons where you want, reorder them as you please, and even get rid of unwanted ones.

Add Properties Button to Caja’s Toolbar

First off, open the file for editing with the following command:

pluma admin:///usr/share/caja/ui/caja-navigation-window-ui.xml

The second half of the file deals with the toolbar, so locate the button you want to put your custom ones after. Hit Enter at the end of that line, and paste the code below into the empty paragraph beneath it, making sure to preserve the indent. I’ve added mine near the far end of the toolbar, but you can add it wherever you please.

<toolitem name="Properties" action="Properties"/>

Once you’ve added your custom button, save the file, then reload Caja (either by manually closing all windows, or running caja -q in the terminal, then opening Caja again). Your new toolbar button will be there and ready to use!

Separators, Reordering Buttons & Removing Unwanted Buttons

And if you want to add a separator anywhere, just add <separator/> in between the lines of the buttons (or if you want the reverse, to remove a separator, then delete that line).

If you want to reorder your buttons to your liking, it’s as easy as moving around the lines of code. And, lastly, if there are default toolbar buttons you can do without, simply delete the lines for them. Or, if you’d prefer to comment them out, note that being an .xml file, you can’t use a hash (#) – that results in the entire toolbar disappearing. The correct syntax for XML files is to start the line off with a less-than symbol followed by an exclamation point and two dashes (<!--), then end the line with two dashes followed by a greater-than symbol (-->). In the following example, I’m commenting out the “Stop” button (which is useless in my opinion, and just taking up valuable space), and note that since there is already a greater-than symbol (>) at the end, all you need to do is insert two dashes (--) before it:

<!--	<toolitem name="Stop" action="Stop"/-->

You will see in the file that the line has been successfully commented out:

Once you’ve finished your toolbar tweaks, you will of course need to reload Caja for the changes to take effect.

See also: Full List of Available Caja Toolbar Buttons

☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻

The tutorial above is TOTALLY FREE, and I hope you found it useful! But if this information really made your day, because it rescued you from hours of headache, or allowed you to accomplish something you thought was impossible, then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or pizza for my time and effort! Many thanks in advance!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

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Caja is a great file-manager, and one feature that many use, and that Nautilus discarded aeons ago, is the Split View option to open another pane in the same window. Personally, I’ve never been a huge fan of that, preferring to drag files, etc, to another tab, or entirely new window. So for those of us who prefer this approach, it makes sense to have toolbar buttons for Open New Tab and Open New Window.

But one limitation of Caja is that you can’t customise the toolbar in the Preferences dialogue. However, you can in fact add new buttons, and remove unwanted ones, and I’ll show you how.

It comes down to specifying toolitems in the config file caja-navigation-window-ui.xml, and wherever you paste the code will determine where the buttons end up. For example, if you add the code for your custom buttons after the entry for the Home button, that’s where they will end up; if you add them after all the default buttons, they will end up on the right end of the toolbar. So you can add your buttons where you want, reorder them as you please, and even get rid of unwanted ones.

Add “Open New Tab” and “Open New Window” Buttons

First off, open the file for editing with the following command:

pluma admin:///usr/share/caja/ui/caja-navigation-window-ui.xml

The second half of the file deals with the toolbar, so locate the button you want to put your custom ones after. Hit Enter at the end of that line, and paste the code below into the empty paragraph beneath it, making sure to preserve the indent. Personally, I put these near the end of the toolbar, but you can put them wherever you please, and you can of course reverse the order of those two buttons, or just add one of them.

<toolitem name="New Tab" action="New Tab"/>
<toolitem name="New Window" action="New Window"/>

Once you’ve added your custom buttons, save the file, then reload Caja (either by manually closing all windows, or running caja -q in the terminal, then opening Caja again). Your new toolbar buttons will be there and ready to use!

Separators, Reordering Buttons & Removing Unwanted Buttons

And if you want to add a separator anywhere, just add <separator/> in between the lines of the buttons (or if you want the reverse, to remove a separator, then delete that line).

If you want to reorder your buttons to your liking, it’s as easy as moving around the lines of code. And, lastly, if there are default toolbar buttons you can do without, simply delete the lines for them. Or, if you’d prefer to comment them out, note that being an .xml file, you can’t use a hash (#) – that results in the entire toolbar disappearing. The correct syntax for XML files is to start the line off with a less-than symbol followed by an exclamation point and two dashes (<!--), then end the line with two dashes followed by a greater-than symbol (-->). In the following example, I’m commenting out the “Stop” button (which is useless in my opinion, and just taking up valuable space), and note that since there is already a greater-than symbol (>) at the end, all you need to do is insert two dashes (--) before it:

<!--	<toolitem name="Stop" action="Stop"/-->

You will see in the file that the line has been successfully commented out:

Once you’ve finished your toolbar tweaks, you will of course need to reload Caja for the changes to take effect.

See also: Full List of Available Caja Toolbar Buttons

☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻

The tutorial above is TOTALLY FREE, and I hope you found it useful! But if this information really made your day, because it rescued you from hours of headache, or allowed you to accomplish something you thought was impossible, then please consider making a donation via PayPal, to buy me a donut, beer, or pizza for my time and effort! Many thanks in advance!

Buy Ubuntu Genius a Beer to say Thanks!

Read Full Post »